What i Really Wanna Say i Can't Define;

Molly. 21.
humansofnewyork:

"You’re either a good person or a bad person. It doesn’t matter what color or what religion you are. You’re good. Or you’re bad."

humansofnewyork:

"You’re either a good person or a bad person. It doesn’t matter what color or what religion you are. You’re good. Or you’re bad."

humansofnewyork:

“I never had any family growing up. But I still went to school everyday. One day, when I was in eleventh grade, my English teacher came up to me and said: “If you graduate, I’ll adopt you. I’ll show you the life. You’ll do things you never dreamed of.” And he kept his promise. He made it legal and everything. On the day I graduated, he was the only family I had there. My father’s taken me everywhere since then. I’ve done all kinds of things.”

humansofnewyork:

“I never had any family growing up. But I still went to school everyday. One day, when I was in eleventh grade, my English teacher came up to me and said: “If you graduate, I’ll adopt you. I’ll show you the life. You’ll do things you never dreamed of.” And he kept his promise. He made it legal and everything. On the day I graduated, he was the only family I had there. My father’s taken me everywhere since then. I’ve done all kinds of things.”

humansofnewyork:

I was transporting Susie The Dog across town, when this man walked up and started admiring her. It quickly became apparent that he really, really loved dogs. “I’ve trained them all my life,” he explained. Soon he was getting emotional. “All you do is feed them,” he said, “and they love you so much for it. I still cry for my first dog. She would not eat unless I was eating. I once had a fever for three weeks, and she would not eat because I couldn’t eat.” He started to tear up a bit. “She ended up getting stolen,” he said. “When you lose a dog, it’s just as bad as losing a human. They may be less intelligent but the emotional connection is the same.”

humansofnewyork:

I was transporting Susie The Dog across town, when this man walked up and started admiring her. It quickly became apparent that he really, really loved dogs. “I’ve trained them all my life,” he explained. Soon he was getting emotional. “All you do is feed them,” he said, “and they love you so much for it. I still cry for my first dog. She would not eat unless I was eating. I once had a fever for three weeks, and she would not eat because I couldn’t eat.” He started to tear up a bit. “She ended up getting stolen,” he said. “When you lose a dog, it’s just as bad as losing a human. They may be less intelligent but the emotional connection is the same.”

humansofnewyork:

“When my husband was dying, I said: ‘Moe, how am I supposed to live without you?’ He told me: ‘Take the love you have for me and spread it around.’”

humansofnewyork:

“When my husband was dying, I said: ‘Moe, how am I supposed to live without you?’ He told me: ‘Take the love you have for me and spread it around.’”

humansofnewyork:

Today I had the honor of speaking at the UNIS conference at the UN. After I was finished, three students recited original poems from the stage. One of them really blew me away:
Fluorescent Adolescence
Overqualified yet underachievingIt’s singing delightfully off key to the radioYet pitch perfect in the showerIt’s spending a half hour in the morningPerfecting your messy bunIt’s gelling bedheadIt’s lifting weights yet covering yourself up in turtlenecksIt’s being a closet philosopher but blaming lackluster grades on “not trying?”It’s tumbling, sharing, instagrammingThe perpetual pursuit of cool but aloof,hard to get,wit,sarcasm,invincibility.
It’s the cycle of hurtingFixinglovinghatingwantinglying… and then telling the truth.It sucks.But perhaps when we’re oldera new set of problems will cause us to miss those of adolescence.So I guess we should learn to love the pain,Since it’s pain that allows us to live and love radically,feel monumentally,and smell the coffee or watch the stars, or hear the musicthat we might later pass by in the rush of the real world.
For now we are poetsAnd activistsAstronautsBloggersWritersPhotographersTeachersEngineers and InventorsFor now, we are what we want to be.Some say the grass is greener on the other side but I’d disagree:I say our grass fluorescent. 

humansofnewyork:

Today I had the honor of speaking at the UNIS conference at the UN. After I was finished, three students recited original poems from the stage. One of them really blew me away:

Fluorescent Adolescence

Overqualified yet underachieving
It’s singing delightfully off key to the radio
Yet pitch perfect in the shower
It’s spending a half hour in the morning
Perfecting your messy bun
It’s gelling bedhead
It’s lifting weights yet covering yourself up in turtlenecks
It’s being a closet philosopher but blaming lackluster grades on “not trying?”
It’s tumbling, sharing, instagramming
The perpetual pursuit of cool but aloof,
hard to get,
wit,
sarcasm,
invincibility.

It’s the cycle of hurting
Fixing
loving
hating
wanting
lying… and then telling the truth.
It sucks.
But perhaps when we’re older
a new set of problems will cause us to miss those of adolescence.
So I guess we should learn to love the pain,
Since it’s pain that allows us to live and love radically,
feel monumentally,
and smell the coffee or watch the stars, or hear the music
that we might later pass by in the rush of the real world.

For now we are poets
And activists
Astronauts
Bloggers
Writers
Photographers
Teachers
Engineers and Inventors
For now, we are what we want to be.
Some say the grass is greener on the other side but I’d disagree:
I say our grass fluorescent. 

humansofnewyork:

“I’ve got terminal cancer. They wanted to do surgery but I don’t have much time and that would put me in a wheelchair. Yesterday, I helped a kid learn to ride a bike. That’s something, right? That’s a slice of life. Couldn’t do that in a wheelchair.”
(Boston, MA)

humansofnewyork:

“I’ve got terminal cancer. They wanted to do surgery but I don’t have much time and that would put me in a wheelchair. Yesterday, I helped a kid learn to ride a bike. That’s something, right? That’s a slice of life. Couldn’t do that in a wheelchair.”

(Boston, MA)